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Cheese and Pickle

After eons of reading about cheese and pickle sandwiches, I only recently figured out that you Brits do NOT mean cheese with slices of dill pickle. Which always made me think, "Ick", in the midst of the story. Isn't language fun? Chips are fries, and crisps are chips, and confusion reigns. I love it.

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
evalentine99
Aug. 7th, 2013 01:10 am (UTC)
The pickle in this case is Branson Pickles. Comes in a jar. Dill pickles are a US favorite are are an aquired taste. I remove them when ever they are in a Bigmac as they are so sour.

Pavements are sidewalks
Flats are apartments.
Mobiles are cell phones.
Sweets are candy.
excentric397
Aug. 7th, 2013 01:34 am (UTC)
I don't like dills, either. I always ask that they are left off whatever I order. I knew the rest, except pavements. But the pickles threw me. It just always sounded so unappetizing. The whole ground/floor thing still puzzles me, too, but it doesn't seem to be an error since I see it so often. Don't think I'll ever make it to the UK, and even though my maternal grandfather was English and my paternal grandfather was Scots-Irish (whatever that means), I don't even know if I still have relatives there.
ms_bekahrose
Aug. 7th, 2013 05:20 am (UTC)
I believe it means, one of your grandad's parents was Irish, and the other was Scottish. It's like saying Japanese-American or Italian-American.

I'm a bit confused by ground/floor... I'm not sure what you mean by that as British and Australian use both, though they are not always interchangeable.
excentric397
Aug. 7th, 2013 03:50 pm (UTC)
Well, since you asked (sort of), I keep seeing stories where people outside sit on the floor, and people inside fall to the ground. Or vice versa. If it was just the one time, I would just think it was a mistake, but I've seen it numerous times. I'm pretty sure it's not always the same author, but I wouldn't swear to it. I have turned into a nit-picker. Help me, please. I am made crazy by the use of span as a tense of spin. It is not. Could English BE more confusing? I can't speak it very well, and it's my first and only language. Well, I can say croissant. That's French. (Yes, I am aiming for funny, but I'm still drinking my morning coffee and the brain has not kicked in yet.)
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )