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Grammar, You Gotta Love It!

I have my pet peeves and my questions. Why do so many people say 'ground' when Jack or whoever is inside, and 'floor' when he is outside? Is this a UK thing? Why, oh, why can't people get that 'span' is reach, not a past tense of spin? 'The Brooklyn Bridge was constructed to span the East River between the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn.' 'Jack spun around quickly.' That is, without doubt, my biggest pet peeve. Point here is, I keep reading 'bored of' instead of 'bored with', which has always been common usage as far as I know. Lo and behold, I decided to google, "when did 'bored with' become 'bored of'. Didn't actually know you could phrase things that way in a search, but did it ever work. Here's the first result:

From here: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/bored-by-of-or-with

"Bored by, of, or with?

Which of these expressions should you use: is one of them less acceptable than the others?

Do you ever get bored with eating out all the time?

Delegates were bored by the lectures.

He grew bored of his day job.

The first two constructions, bored with and bored by, are the standard ones. The third, bored of, is more recent than the other two and it’s become extremely common. In fact, the Oxford English Corpus contains almost twice as many instances of bored of than bored by. It represents a perfectly logical development of the language, and was probably formed on the pattern of expressions such as tired of or weary of. Nevertheless, some people dislike it and it’s not fully accepted in standard English. It’s best to avoid using it in formal writing."

It's not as jarring as 'span' instead of 'spun', but the point really is, I love google. I love that I can come up with a very crudely-fashioned search question, and it gets answered regardless of my lack of skill with the English language. And yes, English is my first, and unfortunately only, language, and I'm still not very good at it. :) Although, I can say 'maisonnette' which I just learned my one-bedroom box is called in England. Also, 'croissant'. Hey, people, I speak French. ;) Oh, 'cafe au lait' you all.

Here's a good resource, if you're not sure about a word:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/

I look things up all the time. I'm especially bad with apostrophes, as in it's, its, or its', and I'm always having to go back and check. Don't you just love words and language and grammar and punctuation and all that jazz? Could it be more confusing? Possibly, but then I'd have to give up speaking all together. Which I also just looked up, and it's correct usage is 'altogether'. Who knew?

Comments

excentric397
Aug. 1st, 2014 09:12 pm (UTC)
You're right. LOL